Brazillian Football Champions PDF Print E-mail

Champions of Série A

Official champions

Below is the table of Campeonato Brasileiro Série A champions according to the Brazilian Football Confederation:

Year Winner Runner-up Comments Entrants
1971
Atlético Mineiro
MG
São Paulo
SP
Three-team final stage. Botafogo eventually finished third. 20
Year Winner Score Runner-up Comments Entrants
1972
Palmeiras
SP
0 - 0 Botafogo
RJ
Palmeiras declared champions due to better season record 26
Year Winner Runner-up Comments Entrants
1973
Palmeiras
SP
São Paulo
SP
Four-team final stage. Palmeiras drew with São Paulo by 0X0 on last stage match 40
Year Winner Score Runner-up Comments Entrants
1974
Vasco
RJ
2 - 1 Cruzeiro
MG
Four-team final stage. Extra tie-break match 40
1975
Internacional
RS
1 - 0 Cruzeiro
MG
46
1976
Internacional
RS
2 - 0 Corinthians
SP
54
1977
São Paulo
SP
0 - 0 Atlético Mineiro
MG
São Paulo won 3-2 on penalties. 60
1978
Guarani
SP
1 - 0
1 - 0
Palmeiras
SP
74
1979
Internacional
RS
2 - 0
2 - 1
Vasco
RJ
Internacional became champions without losing one single game, a deed yet unmatched. 96
1980
Flamengo
RJ
0 - 1
3 - 2
Atlético Mineiro
MG
104
1981
Grêmio
RS
2 - 1
1 - 0
São Paulo
SP
88
1982
Flamengo
RJ
1 - 1
0 - 0
1 - 0
Grêmio
RS
88
1983
Flamengo
RJ
1 - 2
3 - 0
Santos
SP
88
1984
Fluminense
RJ
1 - 0
0 - 0
Vasco
RJ
72
1985
Coritiba
PR
1 - 1
Bangu
RJ
Coritiba won 6-5 on penalties. 40
1986
São Paulo
SP
1 - 1
3 - 3
Guarani
SP
São Paulo won 4-3 on penalties. 80
1987
Sport
PE
1 - 1
1 - 0
Guarani
SP
Four-team final stage turned home-and-away playoff 32
1988
Bahia
BA
2 - 1
0 - 0
Internacional
RS
24
1989
Vasco
RJ
1 - 0 São Paulo
SP
Second final-series match unnecessary as Vasco had a better season record and won the away match 22
1990
Corinthians
SP
1 - 0
1 - 0
São Paulo
SP
20
1991
São Paulo
SP
1 - 0
0 - 0
Bragantino
SP
20
1992
Flamengo
RJ
3 - 0
2 - 2
Botafogo
RJ
20
1993
Palmeiras
SP
1 - 0
2 - 0
Vitória
BA
32
1994
Palmeiras
SP
3 - 1
1 - 1
Corinthians
SP
24
1995
Botafogo
RJ
2 - 1
1 - 1
Santos
SP
24
1996
Grêmio
RS
0 - 2
2 - 0
Portuguesa
SP
Grêmio declared champions due to better season record. 24
1997
Vasco
RJ
0 - 0
0 - 0
Palmeiras
SP
Vasco da Gama declared champions due to better season record 26
1998
Corinthians
SP
2 - 2
1 - 1
2 - 0
Cruzeiro
MG
24
1999
Corinthians
SP
2 - 3
2 - 0
0 - 0
Atlético Mineiro
MG
22
2000
Vasco
RJ
1 - 1
3 - 1
São Caetano
SP
Organized by Clube dos 13 on CBF's behalf, and dubbed Copa João Havelange 116
2001
Atlético Paranaense
PR
4 - 2
1 - 0
São Caetano
SP
28
2002
Santos
SP
2 - 0
3 - 2
Corinthians
SP
26
Year Winner Runner-up Comments Entrants
2003 Cruzeiro
MG
100 pts / 46 matches
Santos
SP
87 pts / 46 matches
From 2003 onwards, the regular season group play followed by play-offs was replaced by a double round-robin system. The team with the most points at the end of the season is declared the champion. 24
2004 Santos
SP
89 pts / 46 matches
Atlético Paranaense
PR
86 pts / 46 matches
24
2005 Corinthians
SP
81 pts / 42 matches
Internacional
RS
78 pts / 42 matches
A refereeing scandal led to a controversial refixturing of 11 matches, the original outcome changing in the majority of games 22
2006 São Paulo
SP
78 pts / 38 matches
Internacional
RS
69 pts / 38 matches
20
2007 São Paulo
SP
77 pts / 38 matches
Santos
SP
62 pts / 38 matches
São Paulo becomes the first team to officially win five Brazilian championships. 20
2008 São Paulo
SP
75 pts / 38 matches
Grêmio
RS
72 pts / 38 matches
São Paulo becomes the first team to be officially recognized by Brazilian Football Confederation as having won 6 Brazilian championships as well as winning it 3 times in a row. 20
2009 Flamengo
RJ
67 pts / 38 matches
Internacional
RS
65 pts / 38 matches

Unofficial champions

At odds with the Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF), which could not come up with a formula for the national championship, the thirteen most popular clubs in Brazil created a league, known as the Clube dos 13, to organize a tournament of their own. This championship was called Copa União and was run by the 16 clubs that took part in it (Santa Cruz, Coritiba and Goiás were invited to join), completely free from CBF authority (a move not unlike the creation of club-administered football leagues all over Europe).

Left to organize a championship without the big thirteen, which would have been a huge fiasco, the CBF came up with a formula that would force the champions and the runner-ups of the Copa União to face the best two teams of the tournament the CBF itself had promoted, also called Módulo Amarelo (Yellow Module). The move, however, was never approved by the Clube dos 13, which rejected any play-off between their own champions and those of the CBF tournament.

Consequently, Flamengo and Internacional, winners and runner-ups of the Copa União, refused to face Sport and Guarani, which had shared the Yellow Module title after deciding to interrupt a penalty shoot-out. Since Flamengo and Internacional did not show up, the CBF championship finals consisted only of a rematch of the Yellow Module finals. In the first game, in Campinas, both teams tied 1-1. On February 7, 1988, Sport beat Guarani 1-0 and became the first Northeastern team to win the national title (a feat only matched by Bahia in the 1988 championship).

Clube dos 13 and the Sports National Council, the competent judicial body to settle the issue at the time, both ruled in favour of Flamengo and Internacional, thus declaring Flamengo as the 1987 Brazilian Champions. The CBF, however, regardless of the CND decision, declared Sport to be the national champions, and the club, along with Guarani, represented Brazil in the 1988 Copa Libertadores de América.

Despite not being recognized by the CBF, several sources list Flamengo and Internacional as respectively the 1987's winners and runner-ups together or instead of the official ones:

Year Winner Score Runner-up Comments Entrants
1987
Flamengo
RJ
1 - 1
1 - 0
Internacional
RS
Organized by Clube dos 13, dubbed Copa União, not recognized by CBF, but recognized by the Clube dos 13, and CND[3] 16

Titles by team

Below are the titles by team, according to the Brazilian Football Confederation, thus excluding the 1987 Copa União, won by Flamengo:

Club State Titles
São Paulo São Paulo 6 titles
Flamengo(1) Rio de Janeiro 5 titles
Corinthians São Paulo 4 titles
Palmeiras São Paulo 4 titles
Vasco(2) Rio de Janeiro 4 titles
Internacional Rio Grande do Sul 3 titles
Grêmio Rio Grande do Sul 2 titles
Santos São Paulo 2 titles
Atlético-MG Minas Gerais 1 title
Guarani São Paulo 1 title
Fluminense Rio de Janeiro 1 title
Coritiba Paraná 1 title
Sport(1) Pernambuco 1 title
Bahia Bahia 1 title
Botafogo Rio de Janeiro 1 title
Atlético-PR Paraná 1 title
Cruzeiro Minas Gerais 1 title

Titles by state

Below are the titles by state, according to the Brazilian Football Confederation, thus excluding the 1987 Copa União, won by Flamengo (from Rio de Janeiro state):

State Titles
São Paulo 17 titles
Rio de Janeiro 11 titles(1)
Rio Grande do Sul 5 titles
Minas Gerais 2 titles
Paraná 2 titles
Bahia 1 title
Pernambuco 1 title(1)
Last Updated on Thursday, 29 April 2010 22:37